You rascal, you

 

I’ll be glad when you’re dead*, you rascal *, you
I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you

I brought you into my home
You wouldn’t leave my wife alone * 
I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you

Now, I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you
I’ll be tickled * to death when you leave this earth, you dog
I took you for my friend
And you tried to drink up all my gin

As I said before, I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you
I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you
When you’re lying six feet deep, no more fried chicken will you eat
I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you

I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you
I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you
You asked my wife for some cabbage * and you ate just like a savage
Oh, rascal you

I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you
I’ll be glad when you’re dead, you rascal, you
I’ll be standing on the corner elevated when they bring your body  * dilapidated
You, dog

* I’ll be glad when you’re dead – future time clauses
This week’s point is the same as the last two weeks’, so out of laziness, I’ll just copy-paste what I wrote then:

_ Structure = when + present simple, future
OR
future + when + present simple

The structure is the same with before, after, as soon as and until. It’s also pretty much the same structure as the first conditional (with if instead of when):

  • If it rains, we won’t go to the beach.

  • She’ll buy a new car if she gets the job.

In this structure, the future can be expressed in different ways:

  • will future
    When they arrive, I’ll call you.

  • be going to
    I’m going to be alright when you come back to me.

  • may/might (to express a possibility = Maybe you will do something.)
    When you finish this book, you might want to see the movie.

  • the imperative
    Call me when you get there.

_ Common mistake = ++ I’ll call you when I will be at the airport. ++
=> NO NO NO!!! => I’ll call you when I am at the airport.

The idea that you express is indeed that of a future action. However, in English, you cannot use the will future after ‘when’ (if when is a conjunction – stay tuned, next week and the week after, we’ll see more of that!).
If you are a Spanish-speaking person, think about what you’d say in Spanish and you’ll realize that it’s almost the same: no future (=> subjunctive).